Tag Archives: women and work

Sunday Reads

  1. Loving these sets of articles about women, women and ambition and the work place.
  2. Thinking of doing this for someone I love.
  3. Something about this video made me so homesick for Nairobi.
  4. Some tips for all the new moms out there.
  5. Love that this guy acknowledges what White Male Privilege has meant for him and his accomplishments.
  6. Kenya goes to the polls in  August this year. A quick primer of some of the issues.
  7. Some great African books to look forward to this year.
  8. Somehow not a fan of all these baby products that work on selling fear to parents.
  9. Some more Obama stuff.
  10. We cannot run from God’s voice, where is He calling you to today?
  11. An effective way to incorporate prayer into your life.
  12. yummy fish recipe.
  13. Getting kids to [always] eat veggies.

On women and work

Source

Women at work

Hillary Clinton speaking to Humans of New York (HONY) on an issue that a lot of women have to contend with in the work place, how do you get people to get past your femininity and take you seriously?

“I was taking a law school admissions test in a big classroom at Harvard. My friend and I were some of the only women in the room. I was feeling nervous. I was a senior in college. I wasn’t sure how well I’d do. And while we’re waiting for the exam to start, a group of men began to yell things like: ‘You don’t need to be here.’ And ‘There’s plenty else you can do.’ It turned into a real ‘pile on.’ One of them even said: ‘If you take my spot, I’ll get drafted, and I’ll go to Vietnam, and I’ll die.’ And they weren’t kidding around. It was intense. It got very personal. But I couldn’t respond. I couldn’t afford to get distracted because I didn’t want to mess up the test. So I just kept looking down, hoping that the proctor would walk in the room. I know that I can be perceived as aloof or cold or unemotional. But I had to learn as a young woman to control my emotions. And that’s a hard path to walk. Because you need to protect yourself, you need to keep steady, but at the same time you don’t want to seem ‘walled off.’ And sometimes I think I come across more in the ‘walled off’ arena. And if I create that perception, then I take responsibility. I don’t view myself as cold or unemotional. And neither do my friends. And neither does my family. But if that sometimes is the perception I create, then I can’t blame people for thinking that.”

Sunday Reads

  1. Baaagh! shaving season is upon us.
  2. My oldest nephew is headed to teenage-hood. Freak out!!
  3. But why is our leader like this?
  4. Definitely baking this lemon and thyme cake this weekend.
  5. I love the idea of helping women over 40 get back into work.
  6. Marriage is often about managing details. FACT.
  7. Recommended baby shower gifts.
  8. The Real Housekids imitate the Real Housewives of Atlanta.Hopefully, they get round to imitating all the series of this show.
  9. Funny mom emoji’s.
  10. I liked Tsitsi Dangaremba and this was an interesting read.

Sunday Reads

  1. This article captures how a good policy intended for women can conversely benefit men.
  2. Tips to help one eat in moderation.
  3. Again this article on how African women’s bodies are fetishised and no one really cares for us. They never loved us!
  4. This place has been popping up quite often, should try and stop by before the cool kids monopolise it.
  5. For anyone looking to study for a PhD. Some valuable advice.

Long Sunday Reads

  1. Thoughtful cards that recognise the many paths to parenthood.
  2. I would happily co-sign the petition to have all academic research freely distributed. (NY Times link)
  3. The top researchers on RePec (Research Papers in Economics) from a ” Developing Country” are all male and predominantly pale.
  4. Jeez, the ethics and externalities stemming from a privately owned city in India.
  5. Decorating together as a couple.
  6. Relationships aren’t always exciting or glamorous. And that’s fine. These 24 comics celebrate the more mundane bits of things #7, 12,16,17,19 and especially 22.
  7. I’m already so iffy about eating eggs, not sure it was wise to read this egg on whether to wash eggs or not, whether to keep them in the fridge or not.
  8. Daily life in a major Accra slum. Very riveting (but could be gross) read.
  9. Imagine if your hotel owner knowingly spied on you while you visited their hotel?
  10. Don’t let fear dictate how your life should be / the pressures that women face regarding marriage.
  11. Data sources for researchers, many free and easily available.
  12. No more boy only OR girl only books.
  13. Wearable baby tech marketed to parents based on fear mongering.So shameful and morally horrid.
  14. What will happen when African leaders take their election rigging online? I cannot even imagine!
  15. I am sometimes guilty of not taking my job THIS seriously!!
  16. Various recipes this week.

“Ship before you are ready, because you will never be ready”

I love Seth Godin and look forward to his daily blogs. Below, a recent one that totally challenged my work ethic, copied word for word from his blog here.

Show your work

It’s tempting to sit in the corner and then, voila, to amaze us all with your perfect answer.

But of course, that’s not what ever works.

What works is evolving in public, with the team. Showing your work. Thinking out loud. Failing on the way to succeeding, imperfecting on your way to better than good enough.

Do people want to be stuck with the first version of the iPhone, the Ford, the Chanel dress? Do they want to read the first draft of that novel, see the rough cut of that film? Of course not.

Ship before you’re ready, because you will never be ready. Ready implies you know it’s going to work, and you can’t know that. You should ship when you’re prepared, when it’s time to show your work, but not a minute later.

The purpose isn’t to please the critics. The purpose is to make your work better.

Polish with your peers, your true fans, the market. Because when we polish together, we make better work.

I tend to wait until I have the perfect answer, or I have the perfect report/ proposal or I have prepared the perfect meal before I speak up and sometimes what is required is that you give a suggestion or you show that you are engaging with the material.

I will now ship before I am ready because unlike the common saying, I will never be ready!!

Sunday Reads (the how-to version)

  1. I love this beautiful Joburg home – the art and the styling. Yum!
  2. How do you stop dirty money flows?
  3. How do you invest your windfall?
  4. An experts summary of how to reduce sugar in your baking.
  5. For anyone that needs tips on conception.
  6. So many ethical issues regarding this Surrogate mother’s tale.
  7. As the gap in education access and attainment continues to broaden, this is the reality for some kids.
  8. How to crotchet a chunky knit blanket.
  9. For all of us that need to learn to say no graciously.
  10. How do you get health officials not to steal donor funds? You send an enforcer and you put in repercussions.
  11. On the unpaid work that women often do.
  12. Watch 100 Years of Black Men hairstyles in one minute.
  13. On Cancer and other health scans and the depths that people will sink to.
  14. A project that shows how fickle international borders really are.

 

Late Sunday reads

Funny thing but I found this lying in my drafts … please enjoy the old-ish links. Hope you are all having a lovely week and hopefully the next one starts on a positive note.

  1. The economics behind standing in line. Who knew?
  2. Things ARE looking up in the Development world.
  3. Practical and very thoughtful approach to Development (please also look through the comments)
  4. Quantifying the sacrifices given up at Lent
  5. The next time you want to like sad news on social media (little hint: Don’t. Never. It’s not a good idea)
  6. Please read this for the comments and the shade. Yoh! the shade
  7. Double whammy! Black and a female economist!
  8. Women and negotiation. Damned if you, damned if you don’t
  9. Recipes to try this week: Chocolate cake, Cardamon crumb cake, Lentil and rice salad

Enjoy and please feel free to leave comments with interesting stuff you read this week.

Book Review: Lean In

I had the pleasure of reading Sheryl Sandberg’s book Lean In, and these are some key points she made that struck a chord with me.

Mentoring

Mentors select protégés based on performance and potential – excel and you will get a mentor.

Feedback

Asking for input is not a sign of weakness but often the first step to finding a path forward.

  • Feedback is an opinion,  grounded in observations and experiences,  which allows us to know what impressions we make on others. Feedback, like truth, is not absolute.
  • When arguments turn into “she said/she said,” we all lose.

Career progression

Ladders are limiting … jungle gyms offer a more creative exploration.

  • I recommend adopting two concurrent goals: a long-term dream and an eighteen month plan.
  • Only one criterion matters when picking a job – fast growth.
  • In the medium-term what skill will I endeavour to learn?  Trying to over correct is a great way to find middle ground.

Women & Work

I truly believe that the single most important career decision that a Woman makes is whether she will have a life partner and who that partner is.

  • When I don’t feel confident one tactic I’ve learned is that it sometimes helps to fake it. 
  • Owning one’s success is key to achieving more success.
  • One reason women avoid stretch assignments and new challenges is that they worry too much about whether they currently have the skills they need for a new role. This can become a self-fulfilling prophecy since so many abilities are acquired on the job.
  • The months and years leading up to having children are not the time to lean back, but the critical time to lean in.
  • Anyone who wants her mate to be a true partner must treat him as an equal – and equally capable- partner.
  • If there is a new normal for the workplace, there is a new normal for the home too.
    Every job will demand some sacrifice.  The key is to avoid unnecessary sacrifice.
  • Equal opportunity is not equal unless everyone receives the encouragement that makes seizing those opportunities possible.
  • Gender should neither magnify nor excuse rude and dismissive treatment.  We should expect professional behaviour, even kindness,from everyone. We must work harder to rise above this. The gender wars need an immediate and lasting peace. True equality will only be achieved when we all fight the stereotypes that hold us back.

All in all, this was an awesome book to read and I read it at the read it at the right time in my career. At a time when I am changing jobs, looking to be more assertive at work and take some risks as well, looking at the horizon and deciding on whether I could maybe like to settle down and what that might look like. This book is a definite must-read. I will leave you with the sad quote below:

It is a painful truth that one of the obstacles to more women gaining power has sometimes been  women already in power.