Saturday Truths …



Date ideas

This is a working list that I will probably keep editing and referring to.

  • Dinner Date at Home
  • Series / movies marathon – Our favourite Series are: Modern Family, Empire, Scandal, Suits.
  • Go on walks around your neighbourhood.
  • Explore the restaurants in your local neighbourhood.
  • Massages at home and professionally.
  • Learn a new hobby or activity together.
  • Play board games.
  • Talk through stuff both the profound and the simple things. Talk.

What do you and your loved one enjoying doing together?


The mystery of Africa’s disappearing presidents — Quartz

President Peter Mutharika returned to Malawi on Sunday Oct. 16, just as he’d promised. Mutharika left to attend the United Nations General Assembly mid-September and just didn’t come back. His cagey communications team would not divulge the leader’s itinerary, sparking rumors that he’d died, and the hilarious hashtag #BringBackMutharika. Mutharika is the latest African president…

via The mystery of Africa’s disappearing presidents — Quartz

stars & posture

I am a child of God and like you, it helps on the darkest and best of days🙂

You will remember his name

Dr Lwazi Lushaba has had his name all over the #Fallist debate and today I read an open letter he penned to his Department Head.

In the afternoon of the 24th August 2016, the HoD of Politics at UCT addressed to me a letter, whose contents we shall in a moment discourse about. He opens the letter with the following salutation; Dear Lwazi. He could as well have written; Dear Dr. Lwazi Lushaba. It would not have made any difference. For, I cannot say with certainty what I, in his modern imaginary, represent. Accordingly, I have permitted myself the liberty of leading him to the abyss wherein dwells the shattered fragments of my being so he may recognise me for what and who I am. I am of those whose skin colour makes them objects of scorn and disregard. I am one with the black children of Masiphumelele, Imizamo Yethu, Gugulethu, and other black slums who with their tender bare black bodies play all day long in stagnant pools of discarded bathing water, urine, menstrual blood, vomit of drunken black souls, and perhaps discharge from a backyard abortion performed on a body too young to bear life. I am one with those in this country who grow up certain that success is destined to elude them because they are black. For us it remains dark even though the day should have started.

It is a heavy letter and it touches on an entire PhD worth of themes but it’s a worthwhile read because it summarises cogently the state of the races across institutions such as universities and the work place. Please bookmark it and read it when you get the chance to.

Things to do in Nairobi (for me)

I was listening to Cape Talk this afternoon and the presenter was talking of the touristy things in Cape Town that local residents had never gotten round to doing. This triggered a similar thought for Nairobi. So here goes my list according to Travel Start and

  1. Go Karting on Langata Road.
  2. Ice Skating at Panari Sky Centre.
  3. Watch a local production at Phoenix Theatre.
  4. Visit the highest floor of the Kenyatta International Conference Centre (KICC).
  5. Attend Rugby Sevens.

Do you live in an iconic city? Have you crossed off most items on your city’s to-do list?


Sunday Reads on Africa

  1. I have read ten of these 50 must-read books by African female writers.
  2. Exclusive Books publish their first newsletter focused on African Lit. Great start.
  3. A South African church in pictures.
  4. Hot jams to get you ready for the week ahead!
  5. Beyonce’s style of feminism is not my own.” Chimamanda Adichie.
  6. I would venture a guess that most black women have this growing up with black hair story.
  7. On intersectionality. Yaa Gyasi’s essay on what it means to be Ghanaian in America.
  8. Pettinah Gappah’s recent short story.
  9. Love and Johannesburg. The couple reminds me of the Mr and I.
  10. 21 gifts for the creative black woman in your life.
  11. A guide to Africa’s dictators. Here and Here.
  12. Rachel Strohm highlights work by the team at Democracy in Africa in putting together a long reading list of articles on African issues by African scholars.
  13. This page showing Everyday Africa.
  14. But why is my leader like this? Not sure we need mandarin studies in Uganda just yet.

Words we Need

All these words are from Urban Dictionary. Yuje disclaimer is that there are some very sexualised and irreligious terms there so tread with care!

The noise someone makes when they want to let you know they are in a bathroom stall
A text message containing information (usually unflattering or damaging) about a third party which is sent to the individual it concerns rather than the person for whom the communication is intended.
When a person in casual conversation drops extremely depressing information in an order to derail the conversation to a more depressing state.
When you send or receive a text that is so long that you need to scroll down.
An insincere apology or expression of regret, often blaming the aggrieved party for being offended or bringing up an irrelevant topic to distract.
A female who conforms to her surroundings and claims she is unique. She often drinks Starbucks, wears Ugg boots in August, and posts selfies on social networking sites every. single. day. Also uses hashtags that don’t have anything to do with the picture itself.
Short form for “usual”.
When your phone or tablet indicates that you are connected to a wireless network, however you are still unable to load webpages or use any internet services with your device
Morning (AM) bowel movement (BM). The first poop of the day, almost always taken immediately upon awakening in the morning.
1. Purposely stinking up the toilet before your roommate or significant other needs to use the bathroom.
2. Walking into the bathroom after forgetting you took a stinky dump just minutes earlier.
I think craptrap, nonpology and lie-fi are my best and will definitely get added into my daily vocabulary.

Self care is a verb

After three weeks of having school closed and hearing against and for free and decolonised education, this morning I just woke up exhausted and needing to take a breather from all of it.

I have come to believe that caring for myself is not self indulgent. Caring for myself is an act of survival. -Alice Lorde:


Beautiful Girl Take Care Of Yourself:


21 quotes to help inspire self-love, and make it easier to see how wonderful you are and the beauty within yourself. Think about how not loving yourself is holding you back. When we choose actions that support our mental, physical and spiritual well-being, self-love can become a certainty. Click through to and begin the journey to love yourself. Pin it now to be inspired at any time.:


I am off to take care of myself because today I cannot.

A Wonder of the World

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I recently went to Victoria Falls in Zimbabwe and all I can say of the trip is heat, beauty and Vic Falls. Wow, just wow!!!



Travel Wanderlist

Image result for waiting at an airport image

Before I die, I would love to visit the following places:

  1. Lamu, Kenya.
  2. Africa: Morocco, Namibia and Senegal.
  3. Asia – India, Hong Kong, Vietnam, Singapore, Portugal, Thailand and Bangladesh.
  4. The US: New York, Washington DC
  5. Melbourne.
  6. Europe: London, Paris, Czech Republic, Spain and Portugal.

Here’s to safe and happy travelling!


True Love is this …

This week’s lesson at BSF was on John 3, where Nicodemus approaches Jesus and learns that all who believe in Jesus are born again and have eternal life. Salvation is the necessary prerequisite to access the kingdom of God and eternal life. We become children of God when we receive Him, believe in our hearts and confess in our hearts that Jesus is Lord. I love the song and the lyrics below because they express this point in a beautiful way. Salvation is to be found in no other name but the Lord Jesus Christ (Acts 4: 12). There is only way to heaven, not many.

There is Love
That came for us
Humbled to a sinner’s cross
You broke my shame and sinfulness
You rose again victorious

Faithfulness none can deny
Through the storm
And through the fire
There is truth that sets me free
Jesus Christ who lives in me

You are stronger
You are stronger
Sin is broken
You have saved me
It is written
Christ is risen
Jesus You are Lord of all

No beginning and no end
You’re my hope and my defense
You came to seek and save the lost
You paid it all upon the cross

Dear Arch Tutu …

Archbishop Desmond Tutu celebrating mass at St George's Cathedral, Cape Town, on his 85th birthday

Background to letter available here. Briefly, the Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu (the Arch) now supports the movement for individuals to be given the right to end their life with no repercussions on their remaining loved ones.

Dear Arch Tutu,

I would like to start with thanking you on your contribution to the South African history and for your role in speaking truth to power in the Democratic republic. It takes guts and in your case loads of prayers and the Nobel Peace Prize  is well deserved.

However, your position on homosexuality and now euthanasia leave a sour taste in my mouth.

As Christians we believe that the inspired Word of God remains supreme over our lives and we remain submitted to it in its’ entirety. This is doctrinal fidelity. (Un)fortunately, we do not get to pick and choose sections of the Bible we believe in and those we want to continue to uphold. All scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness,  so that the servant of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work (2 Timothy 3:16 – 17). God created all things, visible and invisible and He holds and sustains all things because the Supreme Being  (Colossians 1: 16 – 18). God gives life and only He can take it. No one and nothing else. Of course this raises many questions, life support machines and the likes, but the broader principle holds. God holds all of life together by His power. We do not get to pick and choose when life ends.

It saddens me that these final utterances are what people will remember of your legacy. This is not the truth. This spoils your spiritual legacy and more than that, its damaging as certain groups of believers and non-believers will use your utterances as the final word more than what the Bible actually says. As a spiritual leader, myself included, it is important that we realise that people look to us for direction and that we must demonstrate some level of care in how we present ourselves as witnesses of the Lamb.

Ideally, I would like you to recant these words but in place of that, rather stay away from certain statements or be measured in your response when pinned for an answer.




Sunday Reads

  1. Cooking with pears
  2. I love apple cider vinegar, here are 16 reasons its good for you.
  3. Fun places and spaces to visit around downtown Johannesburg.
  4. When you look pregnant but you aren’t (NY Times).
  5. On how we short-change girls.
  6. On the insane pressure on moms relative to dads.

Women at work

Hillary Clinton speaking to Humans of New York (HONY) on an issue that a lot of women have to contend with in the work place, how do you get people to get past your femininity and take you seriously?

“I was taking a law school admissions test in a big classroom at Harvard. My friend and I were some of the only women in the room. I was feeling nervous. I was a senior in college. I wasn’t sure how well I’d do. And while we’re waiting for the exam to start, a group of men began to yell things like: ‘You don’t need to be here.’ And ‘There’s plenty else you can do.’ It turned into a real ‘pile on.’ One of them even said: ‘If you take my spot, I’ll get drafted, and I’ll go to Vietnam, and I’ll die.’ And they weren’t kidding around. It was intense. It got very personal. But I couldn’t respond. I couldn’t afford to get distracted because I didn’t want to mess up the test. So I just kept looking down, hoping that the proctor would walk in the room. I know that I can be perceived as aloof or cold or unemotional. But I had to learn as a young woman to control my emotions. And that’s a hard path to walk. Because you need to protect yourself, you need to keep steady, but at the same time you don’t want to seem ‘walled off.’ And sometimes I think I come across more in the ‘walled off’ arena. And if I create that perception, then I take responsibility. I don’t view myself as cold or unemotional. And neither do my friends. And neither does my family. But if that sometimes is the perception I create, then I can’t blame people for thinking that.”

Book Review: The Book of Memory

Image result for the book of memory

The story that you have asked me to tell you does not begin with the pitiful ugliness of Lloyd’s death. It begins on a long-ago day in August when the sun seared my blistered face and I was nine years old and my father and mother sold me to a strange man.

Memory, the narrator of Petina Gappah’s The Book of Memory, is an albino woman languishing in Chikurubi Maximum Security Prison in Harare, Zimbabwe, after being sentenced for murder. As part of her appeal, her lawyer insists that she write down what happened as she remembers it. The death penalty is a mandatory sentence for murder, and Memory is, both literally and metaphorically, writing for her life. As her story unfolds, Memory reveals that she has been tried and convicted for the murder of Lloyd Hendricks, her adopted father. But who was Lloyd Hendricks? Why does Memory feel no remorse for his death? And did everything happen exactly as she remembers?

Moving between the townships of the poor and the suburbs of the rich, and between past and present, the 2009 Guardian First Book Award–winning writer Petina Gappah weaves a compelling tale of love, obsession, the relentlessness of fate, and the treachery of memory.

The book reminded me of the book, We Need New Names by NoViolet Bulawayo particularly when she talks of the Harare township where Memory grew up. The characterisation of township life was totally believable and reminded me of my experience growing up. The book also does a good job of personifying the life behind bars and the dynamics of womanhood and female friendships.

Overall, Gappah is a lovely story teller, she builds it up slowly and steadily then lets it slow down later. I loved the pace. It totally sucked me in and I read it over a day or two. Then at the end I just hugged the book and smiled. The story continually switches between a flashback to the past and present time. Despite this, it was still easy to follow the broader tale.

Common themes raised in the book include: language, memory, family (siblings, mother-daughter, husband-wife), religion, colonialism(or race as a subset). Various questions I had though while reading the book include:

  • In light of the decolonised free education in our lifetime protests currently happening in South African universities, is the best education White/ Western and in a foreign (ex-colonialist) language? To what extent has this changed? Would you/ I feel comfortable to take our kid to a native school ala Spilt Milk? I am not sure. In terms of decolonising language, the best book I have read on this topic so far is Decolonising the Mind by Ngugi wa Thiong’o.
  • The book also touches on Africa’s complicated history with the White Man. Was Lloyd African? Why because he spoke the language and understood the culture / had allowed himself to be immersed in it fully? If we contrast Lloyd and Alexandra the sister, who is more African?
  • Colonialism and the White Mans’ burden also comes across when we look at the motives of Lloyd in adopting Memory.
  • That duality of existence that I find so intriguing about South Africans and now Zimbabwe. That deep belief in ancestry and mainstream religion or a more modern life. I grew up raised in a predominantly Bible-focused culture and so this duality is totally alien to me.
  • Do we trust our memories? Is it ever as we think or are there things we remember that as we have gotten older we have to come realise are not as they were. As the last child in my home, I have some clear memories of myself as a child but to be honest, I know that a lot of them are mainly based on what I have been told and not necessarily what I particularly remember. What are your earliest memories?

In closing, I am not sure why they did not translate the Shona bits which made me wonder who the real audience is here. It was quite frustrating for me a non-Shona speaker.

Care for my natural hair

I have often said that my hair philosophy is as low maintenance as possible.Hence, you can see how this is such a departure from that when I say that I recently had a hot oil treatment and thereafter made my own hair oil spray.

My formula is:

  • 15ml Coconut Oil
  • 10ml Olive Oil
  • 10ml Almond Oil
  • 5-10 drops Tea Tree Oil
  • 250ml  (Distilled) water

I selected this recipe because I have been experiencing a dry scalp/ dandruff issue and wanted to fix that. Also, I went for one hair talk when they talked about the fact that manufactured products have so many undesirable products in them as well. Please see the chat below showing the benefits of the different hair oils in order to understand why coconut is the main oil. Tea tree oil is the essential oil I used because it also combats dandruff.

Jojoba Oil – Jojoba oil is capable of moisturizing the follicles of hair and hence can make hair strands stronger & healthier. Jojoba also hydrates hair from th:

Cranes in the Sky

A pal sent me the Solange Knowles album and I listened to this song first because I had seen there is a video out already. Catchy, it feels deep but I do not know the entire context.

Caption this!

The situation at the University of Cape Town (UCT) that the Fallists (Fees Must Fall) are fighting for – inclusive and free education for all.




Recent Pins I have loved

Fabulous :)

Love her glasses

Source Unknown

The Role Of Colors In Interior Design. Labor Junction / Home Improvement / House Projects / Pop of Color / Living Room / Design / House Remodels /

Love the pop of colour.


A better view of the lights pendants lined up dining:

I love the lighting fixtures


Natural Hair bride

Her make up is flawless!


Family Nursery wall art Kids Art Art for Nursery by nidhi on Etsy:

Just the imagery of this ..