Tag Archives: New York

Passion catches

I love it when I watch people do anything, however odd or random, that totally absorbs them and that fully consumes them, like this guy in the video.

 

Beware of language though ..

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Books Based in New York City

I love New York, I just love it and so I wanted to share a couple of books that remind me of the Big Apple.

 

  • I have shared before that I did not really like Open City and I thought he was just showing off.
  • I LOVED Behold the Dreamers. I felt it was more relateable.
  • Everyone is raving about the Leavers but I felt it would have been a better short story but it gave me a glimpse of Upstate New York.

Do you love the Big Apple and have you read any books based on this city?

Sunday Reads

  1. These tips on how to give a good toast should be mandatory read. The number of wedding toasts I have heard and cringed.
  2. Free versus structured play. I am all for free play.
  3. Interesting study on why women share photos of their kids on social media.
  4. Apparently more people are using video to inform family and friends alike that they are having a baba! (NYT article).
  5. 10 ways to reduce your wedding budget.
  6. Yes kids get sick at daycare, but they also get sick less often later. This study proves and my mom always said. (NYT article)
  7. Such a sad story but so beautifully and heart-warmingly portrayed.
  8. So much cuteness in these pictures.
  9. On the messaging that we s(sub) consciously send to our daughters.
  10. Spicy carrot cumin and coconut soup.

Men have been denied so many safe spaces where they can be men and vulnerable
Guys like us, it turns out, are hungry for a place to talk with other men, particularly about how fatherhood is changing us, and changing writ large. Just as literature has long helped people see that our seemingly personal struggles are universal, being able to talk in this group offers a similar revelation. In an age of near-constant superficial virtual connection, there’s an enormous benefit in having a real life community to confide in more deeply and provide a genuine social network — especially for men and young fathers so often without it.

(Please also read the comments)

 

Sunday Reads

… brought to you from a Windy and Rainy Cape Town.

  1. Oh Judy Blume! So many memories of first books! (NYT)
  2. Jeez! Grew up on this stuff and never had the frame of mind to think of the broader circumstances.
  3. I kind of want to be like these women! (NYT)
  4. An interesting experiment on race, wonder if it would work in South Africa
For white people … means eventually coming to the understanding that they’re white — and, more particularly, to understand, on a gut level, what white privilege actually means to them. White people are raised to believe they have no race, that they are “normal.” Their whiteness becomes like water, or air — so pervasive as to be invisible.

Book review: Open City–Teju Cole

I have finally gotten to review this book.

The back of the book cover describes the book thus

‘The past, if there is such a thing, is mostly empty space, great expanses of nothing, in which significant persons and events float. Nigeria was like that for me: mostly forgotten, except for those few things that I remembered with outsize intensity.’

Along the streets of Manhattan, a young Nigerian doctor doing his residency wanders aimlessly. The walks meet a need for Julius: they are a release from the tightly regulated mental environment of work, and they give him the opportunity to process his relationships, his recent breakup with his girlfriend, his present, his past. Though he is navigating the busy parts of town, the impression of countless faces does nothing to assuage his feelings of isolation. But it is not only a physical landscape he covers; Julius crisscrosses social territory as well, encountering people from different cultures and classes who will provide insight on his journey-which takes him to Brussels, to the Nigeria of his youth, and into the most unrecognizable facets of his own soul.

A haunting novel about national identity, race, liberty, loss, dislocation, and surrender, Teju Cole’s Open City seethes with intelligence. Written in a clear, rhythmic voice that lingers, this book is a mature, profound work by an important new author who has much to say about our world.

My thoughts?

Overall, I felt the book was pretentious, difficult (even impossible) to get into and as I read it, I thought how it’s possible for people to hype up something crappy into this larger than life thing. I will admit that as a result Open City was on my to-read list for almost three years before I finally bought it and wasted my time reading it.

In many parts I felt it to be unstructured, disjointed and almost like taking a bus that promises to go somewhere but never quite leaves the bus station! I honestly preferred the little story within a story and in those instances I could see the writers brilliance.

Discussed themes that were of interest to me include: the Jewish state, belonging/ identify, family dynamics, Nationhood and Migration as well as the power/benefits of solitude. But I feel like all this was overshadowed by the fact that he wanted to tell us about the different streets that Julius had walked on in New York and Belgium.

Final recommendation: Do not read the book. Avoid at all costs!