Tag Archives: lifestyle

My City is Better than Yours

When I moved to Cape Town, I did not expect to like, or GASP love it, as much as I did Johannesburg. Two years on, I feel like I am cheating on my first love but here goes a list of things I love about the city.

  • Franschhoek and the annual literary festival
  • The Book Lounge
  • The Mountain View
  • Camps Bay – I don’t do this often because it gets touristy and it’s a big contrast to the daily inequality but occasionally, I do note its’ beauty and appreciate that.
  • Wine Farms
  • Unstuffy Markets – Mojo Market, Old Biscuit Mill and Oranjezicht. For some reason in Joburg, peeople need to dress up and then get to markets and look like they just walk up like that, URGGGH!!
  • An Evening BSF Class
  • The Promenade
  • Being able to walk around to most places
  • A main street that means not having to get into a mall unless you want to, Yay!!!
  • Off-street Parking
  • Kalk Bay
  • A gorgeous CBD
  • Love the pace of drivers and their general chill
  • It’s a very outdoors and family-oriented place

Guest post: Keeping up with Scarcity

Please join me in welcoming Scarcity to this here blog. She blogs over at Scarcity’s Notebook  where she is trying to reinvent her blog by writing about herself, life and her creative side. See her brief bio below:

Hi people thanks for stopping by. I’m fun-loving, creative and love being artsy I desire to design on a dime because that’s where I draw my design challenge from. I strive to be clean neat and tidy but most of the time its work in progress. My family and close friends are very dear and important to me and most of all I draw my strength, faith and hope from God.

I’m a working mum and happily married. In my spare time I spend it with my family, reading blogs, cleaning and tidying up.

Imagery speaks volumes and Pinterest just does it for me, most for new projects I want to work on. I gather my inspiration and findings from there.

Currently I’m more interested in DIY projects as I’m accumulating a lot of clutter in my house so I’m reading about what to do with what I have.

The holidays are coming up as well and I have a preschooler at home, so craft ideas are welcome to keep us busy during the festive season. My biggest resource is what I have, for example toys like Legos, disposable birthday cups, tissue paper rolls and the like.

Here are some of the resources I’m going to use for these craft tutorials.

 

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When it comes to design I like the minimalist approach to clean lines and less is more.

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I combine that style with personal finds that I like to have around the house. Example the picture above is a good example of a minimalist home with a personal touch.

I don’t vow by one interior design style but I have preferences here and there. In any interior space cleanliness and order is key. Being clean, neat and tidy comes naturally for me and I can’t function or operate in a messy space.

Cheers!

21: KE vs SA: First impressions

Moving towns is not easy, least of all one that you have lived in 20+ years and love dearly. The following is a list of things I first compared between the new home and old home. Enjoy and take it in the spirit it is intended.

  • Being able to read books and newspapers at the bookshop. And not have to pay for them. Oh and no one looks at you funny or tries to intimidate you.
  • Funeral cover advertising. Like regular health insurance except they pay for the costs of your burial. Ah, Ok!
  • Openly gay people. My sisters and I kept saying there must be a third gender because of these men and women that proudly embrace their “other” sex and take it on full-on. One of the leading local soapies even has an openly gay married couple. Yeah, let’s see that on ANY Kenyan station, public or privately owned!
  • Street fashion. It’s interesting to just stop and stare at people’s unique interpretation of fashion. Very colourful and unique.
  • Understanding the phenomenon that is “excess”. Why am I paying for insurance if I must cough up the first X thousand of any claim I make????? Just sounds like daylight robbery.
  • That motor insurance is optional! In Kenya everyone must have insurance whether comprehensive or third-party. Not so here.
  • The prevalence of Afrikaans and Afrikaners. Coming here I knew South Africa has eleven official languages I just didn’t think it had been integrated and people could openly speak of it or that some people were comfortable with and proud to be culturally Afrikaner!
  • I liked the fact that many people my age spoke an African language. As we all know that’s one thing I sorely regret not being able to partake in.
  • Churches having braais with beer/evening events with sherry and beer! And that after the service you can decide to light up your cigarette and no one will kick you out.
  • Leaving handbags on chairs during communion in church and that no one steals the bags.
  • How people combine traditional and modern/traditional and religion and they just know when to do so.
  • Almost all Black names will have a meaning. Nice!
  • The fascination with race – like never knowing I was Black till I came here.
  • Being told the scope of an exam. How’s about reading the whole semester work and then being surprised coz it is called an exam, right?
  • Calling lecturers by their first name to their face. Yeah!
  • Drinking tap water!  In Kenya that’s asking for death right there.
  • The number of well-maintained public parks for recreation. I keep expecting someone to grab that land and construct a house or school.
  • A public transportation system that actually works and/or cheap cabs.
  • I love(d) that any Church service had people from all racial backgrounds.
  • The difference in pronunciation between stuff I knew from home: Panado v Panadol, Weetbix v Weetabix.
  • Butternut and pumpkins are always sweet. That and the introduction to food stuff like “dombolo” (dumplings) and samp. YUM!