Tag Archives: Kiswahili

Book Review: Who Will Catch Us As We Fall

Against the backdrop of the political shenanigans in Kenya, I read this very interesting book on Kenya by a Kenyan Indian author.

About the Book.
Haunted by a past that has kept her from Nairobi for over three years, Leena returns home to discover her family unchanged: her father is still a staunch patriot dreaming of a better country; her mother is still unwilling or unable to let go of the past; and her brother spends his days provoking the establishment as a political activist. When Leena meets a local Kikuyu artist whose past is linked to her own, the two begin a secret affair—one that forces Leena to again question her place in a country she once called home.

 

Interlinked with Leena’s story is that of Jeffery: a corrupt policeman burdened with his own angers and regrets, and whose questionable actions have unexpected and catastrophic consequences for those closest to him. Who Will Catch Us As We Fall is an epic look at the politics and people of Kenya.

So my general thoughts:

  • The book had quite a slow start, I mean you could tell she is hinting at something that happened in the past but she wasn’t going to give away anything quite so quickly.
  • I thought it was a good attempt for the author to include Kiswahili phrases but it probably needed an editor who also spoke Kiswahili as in the absence of that the book had basic editorial mistakes like the police moto: Utumishi kwa wote, not utamishi kwa wote; Jogoo House not Jogo House.
  • I thought that the city of Nairobi could have been more prominent unless the narrow lens through which it was presented was necessary to present how insular the Indian community in Kenya is?

The book had a few major themes that were particularly meaningful to me.

Race/ Tribe

  • Love that she talks about the race/tribe relations between Indians and Africans in Kenya. How there is a sense of mistrust and almost antagonistic hate or resentment. This was best played out by the employer – employee relations by the Indian mama and her Kikuyu/ African maid.
  • I thought the discussion between Jai and Ivy at the SONU meeting about what makes a Kenyan Kenyan quite insightful. It made me wonder whether by the same reckoning I would be classified as one because though by birth and upbringing I am one, then again, am I actually one? Will Indians ever be viewed as Kenyan?
  • My surprise at Jai choosing to study at UoN instead of going to England which as the mom confirms is the better option and generally the done thing among this sub population.
  • It was interesting to read about Pio Gama Pinto because he is one person who history has not represented very well even all these years later.

Gender

  • Jai could play outside but Leena couldn’t.
  • Jeffrey just “took over” his friends wife like she was a spare item and no one questioned that.
  • Also the fact that the wife just rolled over and adjusted to this new reality.

Power

  • The dynamics between a maid and her employer were very startling and playing into the perception of race and/or tribe in the book is the difference in treatment for a maid between a white and Indian employer.
  • Jeffrey wielded significant power and that was how over time he was able to become as corrupt as he was.
  • Who really ran the home between Jai’s parents, the mom or the dad?

Home

  • Leena’s characterisation of being in Nairobi vs being in London and how one can reimagine / build it up into something bigger than it really is. (p. 335)
  • I loved the following quotes that best typified Nairobi.

“I love this country but I must accept it for what it is. A place where thieves are celebrated and good men die unremarkable deaths.” (p. 357)

“Nairobi is a sly town. It is so small that run-ins with people one is trying to avoid are a common occurrence, yet it is segmented enough to keep two searching individuals apart. (p. 384)

Not as ambitious as Dust but for a contemporary book, it was a great effort and I would certainly recommend it to anyone.

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25. Sunday reads (Video overload)

  1. Linguistically this is why Mama and Baba (Mother and Father in Kiswahili) is almost universal?
  2. On the returns to tertiary education in South Africa. Also this.
  3.  Some people really have a great calling on their lives!!
  4. Beautiful pictures of African kids and their creative hairstyles.
  5. My Pastor was on to something when he spoke about how the child’s environment in the womb is very important! (Video)
  6. Funny how some product adverts go so left that at the end you have to think back to what they could have been advertising. This video is a case in point.
  7. What a gem this video is, dismissive of North Korea but normal against Queen Elizabeth’s birthday and other Royal celebrations.
  8. Would you know how to pronounce this town’s name, Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysilio-gogogoch? Watch how to here.
  9. Some people are really leading interesting lives and following some lovely passions they personally have, watch.
  10. This is what contact lenses looked like 67 years ago!! Jeez!!
  11. Quick and easy couscous salad

A friend is getting married today, shout outs and best wishes.

Sunday Reads

I quite enjoyed putting together the food-related Sunday Reads but this week I went back to the more generic content. Enjoy!!

  1. My sister recently asked about these food in a box services in Kenya. Any leads anyone?
  2. I love this Op-Ed on the Bruce Jenner story. As a Christian, struggling to figure out this whole business so I will stick to his initial name and gender.
  3. This makes genius business sense – buy the left over luggage and on-sell it.  Wonder what happens in South Africa and Kenya or Uganda.
  4. Bringing beautiful Kiswahili sayings to the modern-day world. Nice!! Check out the artists’ tumblr here.
  5. Tried this recipe this week and how YUMMY!
  6. Loving these suggested titles to Rachel “I-Identify-As-Black” Dolezal’s possible memoir title.
  7. How many of these do you remember the before look?
  8. God really made us all so unique. Loving these pictures of these different cultures
  9. “Affordable” Weekend Gateaways in Cape Town. JUST!

Si Lazima!

Post title translation from Kiswahili: One need not

No really, you don’t have to do this. EVER!! Bleaching to me screams of self hate and this is a special kind I mean the lady (sic?) could not even look at herself.