Tag Archives: homosexuality

Sunday Reads

  1. How to read more books this year. I am definitely taking it to heart by reducing my junk TV viewing and making sure I always have a book as I go about various chores.
  2. A reading list on Kenya in case you are interested.
  3. If a story moves you, act on it!
  4. This article on insecurity made me stop and think. Really hard!
  5. Somali nicknames are hilarious 🙂
  6. So many white tears in this article. I see that they have only a given demographic of foreign spouses married to South Africans.
  7. Also, this IS cultural expropriation.
  8. More on how couples deal with finances.
  9. I didn’t know there were Nigerian Jews in Johannesburg. Today’s fact!!
  10. What does it mean to be a boy or girl? National Geographic asks 9/10 year old kids.
  11. Stealing from one of the comments, “This is by far the best article I’ve read regarding LBGT and the gospel.”
  12. Chocolate cake and another vegetarian pasta recipe.
Advertisements

Dear Arch Tutu …

Archbishop Desmond Tutu celebrating mass at St George's Cathedral, Cape Town, on his 85th birthday

Background to letter available here. Briefly, the Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu (the Arch) now supports the movement for individuals to be given the right to end their life with no repercussions on their remaining loved ones.

Dear Arch Tutu,

I would like to start with thanking you on your contribution to the South African history and for your role in speaking truth to power in the Democratic republic. It takes guts and in your case loads of prayers and the Nobel Peace Prize  is well deserved.

However, your position on homosexuality and now euthanasia leave a sour taste in my mouth.

As Christians we believe that the inspired Word of God remains supreme over our lives and we remain submitted to it in its’ entirety. This is doctrinal fidelity. (Un)fortunately, we do not get to pick and choose sections of the Bible we believe in and those we want to continue to uphold. All scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness,  so that the servant of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work (2 Timothy 3:16 – 17). God created all things, visible and invisible and He holds and sustains all things because the Supreme Being  (Colossians 1: 16 – 18). God gives life and only He can take it. No one and nothing else. Of course this raises many questions, life support machines and the likes, but the broader principle holds. God holds all of life together by His power. We do not get to pick and choose when life ends.

It saddens me that these final utterances are what people will remember of your legacy. This is not the truth. This spoils your spiritual legacy and more than that, its damaging as certain groups of believers and non-believers will use your utterances as the final word more than what the Bible actually says. As a spiritual leader, myself included, it is important that we realise that people look to us for direction and that we must demonstrate some level of care in how we present ourselves as witnesses of the Lamb.

Ideally, I would like you to recant these words but in place of that, rather stay away from certain statements or be measured in your response when pinned for an answer.

Sincerely,

Me.

 

Belated Sunday Reads

  1. The movie Happiness.
  2. Environment and other influences also positively (or not) affect outcomes.
  3. Understanding land and identity in Kenya.
  4. An article whose title promised so much but gave nothing finally.
  5. Growing up today. I suddenly felt 76 years old …
  6. Certainly sure my take on this. God loves sinners, we are all sinners.
  7. Is it OK to leave your child unattended while you dash off to the shops?

Two thoughts from this week

A friend of mine came “out” this week – out, as in of the proverbial closet. Well, he was an acquaintance from Church and he led worship as part of the Praise Team.

  • I wasn’t really shocked at his coming out and his statements around it because for the longest time he had been posting very provocative articles on homosexuality and I figured that it maybe because he is currently in Uganda (homophobe capital of the world). On this day he decided to speak plainly and talk about how gay people are out and about and more common than we imagine and thereafter I saw the Christian backlash and response to it all.
  • I stand by the Bible (God’s) position of homosexuality – it is a sin and it is outside of God’s plan for mankind. I am unapologetic about this. However, there is a clear distinction between the man (as indeed we are all fallen) and the sin. The latter is abhorrent to a Holy God while the former is beloved to Him.
  • In portraying this distinction, it is vital that fellow man portrays love and understanding. Love that stems from the knowledge that before God, we all fall short in many areas and the understanding that to God, sin is sin and no one’s is better or less than another’s. Bearing this in mind will guide  your language and approach. Otherwise, we are no different from the Pharisees!
  • Personally, I feel for my friend because this is not an easy path he has selected: i) A large part of his past/present life is Church and he has the dilemma of serving a loving God who does not accept his lifestyle and ii) it’s illegal in East Africa – obviously no one has been convicted as successful prosecution requires that the accused be caught in the act.

One of my first (fast) friends from High School was in town this week and despite receiving additional work just before the planned rendezvous, I am glad that we still made time to have dinner and catch up.

  • Seeing each other after so long resulted in a general acknowledgment that we have all grown up. She is planning a wedding in June and has a little daughter that turns 5 later this year – about as long as I have been with my person. Besides the fact that this November will be 11 years since we finished high school.
  • In reminiscing about high school, we both agreed that if we could go back, we would relax more and do more extra-curricular activities. We did go to one of those schools where success was guaranteed and we should have been equipped instead to know how to better deal with the pressures of success and how to unwind. More importantly, how to fail and get back up. From conversations with some of my other classmates, it’s hit me that it does take us such a while to get there.
  • About having the strength and the foresight to leave a job when it stops feeding that inner part of you that ticks and makes you who you are. And not feeling like a failure at the same time when it does not work out. In determining what to do post-high school, few of us really interrogated the options available to us and presently some of us are going through a period of asking whether this is what we want or not. A very important phase that might improperly be read as being radar less and shifty.
  • The most significant thing she did say to me – women need to be authentic with each other and in the process know when to give yourself a break. In our different roles: daughters, sisters, partners, colleagues … we must know when to ask for help, when to speak up, when things aren’t working out. If women were more honest with themselves …. Who knows how that sentence might end but I will try and find out.

Have you had any interesting conversations this week.